Women and Health Together for the Future

History’s on our side’: Turkish women fighting femicide

As Turkey quits the Istanbul convention, Gülsüm Kav’s group We Will Stop Femicide is helping keep women alive amid a rise in gender-based violence

Gülsüm Kav, a doctor who lectures in medical ethics, pictured in Istanbul

Gülsüm Kav, who lectures in medical ethics, is also a leading Turkish feminist, who has campaigned for victims of femicide. Photograph: Bradley Secker/The Guardian

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Ruth Michaelson Jul 2021 

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“History is on our side,” says Gülsüm Kav. She leans in and speaks intensely. She has a lot to say: Kav helped create Turkey’s We Will Stop Femicide (WWSF) group, and has become one of the country’s leading feminist activists even as the political environment has grown more hostile.

Amid protests, Turkey withdrew from the Istanbul convention, the landmark international treaty to prevent violence against women and promote equality, on Thursday. The Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, has long attacked women’s rights and gender equality, suggesting that feminists “reject the concept of motherhood”, speaking out against abortion and even caesarean sections, and claiming that gender equality is “against nature”.

TURKEY-RIGHTS-WOMEN-DEMO<br>Protesters chant slogans in front of police officers during a rally to mark International Women’s Day in Istanbul, on March 8, 2021. - Thousands of people joined the march to denounce violence against women in Turkey, where more than 400 women were killed last year. The demonstrators are demanding strong measures to stop attacks on women by former partners or family members as well as government commitment to a European treaty on combatting violence against women. (Photo by BULENT KILIC / AFP) (Photo by BULENT KILIC/AFP via Getty Images)

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If Erdoğan is brash and opinionated then Kav, a doctor who lectures in medical ethics, is the opposite. “We work to destigmatise feminism,” she says of We Will Stop Femicide, which she and other members often refer to simply as “the platform”.

Kav is reluctant to say it, but removing the stigma attached to feminism has become more difficult in Turkey, with men’s rights groups and others at odds with her life’s work becoming increasingly empowered by the state. She has come to expect a hostile environment, especially online.

“We’re under some legal pressure, as the platform is affected by countrywide threats to freedom of speech. In some rare cases there might also be threats from the families of perpetrators. Like many activists, I’m sometimes subjected to problems,” she says.

Yet she shrugs off any suggestion that she may be arrested. “Not personally, but collectively there is pressure,” she says, pointing to regional members of WWSF who have been detained or fined.

Protesters hold banners reading ‘We will stop femicides’ during a demonstration against Turkey’s withdrawal from the Istanbul convention, the world’s first binding treaty to combat violence against women.

Protesters hold banners reading ‘We will stop femicides’ during a demonstration against Turkey’s withdrawal from the Istanbul convention, the world’s first binding treaty to combat violence against women. Photograph: Bülent Kılıç/AFP/Getty

The genesis of We Will Stop Femicide came from tragedy. Kav says the murder of a 17-year-old high school pupil, Münevver Karabulut, prompted the group to be founded. Karabulut was killed in 2009 by her boyfriend, Cem Garipoğlu, who subsequently went on the run for six months after Karabulut’s headless body was discovered in a rubbish bin. Istanbul’s then-police chief declared that Karabulut’s family could have prevented the murder “if they took care of their daughter”.

“She wasn’t the first,” says Kav. “But this incident showed us that femicide would only become more important in Turkey from then on. We joined forces with the Karabulut family in order to support them, to shadow them as the trial began, and then we began establishing the platform.”

These woman are fundamentally changing what it means to be a woman in Turkey and yet male violence is suppressing it

Gülsüm Kav

Kav, along with a coalition of bereaved families, lawyers, trade unions and campaigners, began following trials of other suspected femicides. They showed up in courtrooms across Turkey to doggedly track cases in an attempt to get justice.

But the need has never let up. According to WWSF, 300 Turkish women were murdered last year, most by their partners. A further 171 were found dead in suspicious circumstances.

“When we started our work, it was with the idea of stopping femicides, but in order to do that, you first need to know the numbers,” says Kav.

“We thought the government would know, but apparently they didn’t. So we started drawing up reports from press clippings and the families of victims. We now do full reports as well as deeper analysis.”

Today the platform has grown into a vast network of activists and campaigners across Turkey. It has about 750 active members as well as others who turn out for mass street protests. Many take part in WWSF’s “female assemblies”, with specialised chapters for high school pupils or LGBTQ+ members – the latter a rebuke to Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development party’s (AKP) increasingly anti-gay rhetoric.

The platform also hosts online trainings on women’s legal rights, works as a pressure group to push for changes to Turkish law, and runs a hotline to support women who are in danger.

“This is the type of activity I’m most proud of: keeping women alive,” says Kav. The hotline is designed to help women in police stations report violence against them, sometimes providing an accompanying lawyer, as a way to implement Turkey’s sole law against domestic violence.

Gülsüm Kav in an Istanbul park in June 2021.

Gülsüm Kav says: ‘Only 7% of Turkish people were against the [Istanbul] convention, according to polls. The majority of society is in favour.’ Photograph: Bradley Secker/The Guardian

This work has got results. Turkey’s minister for the family began following up on femicide trials, and the government now uses the word “femicide”, due to the group’s work, even if campaigners say it shirks responsibility for combatting it. After a period in which WWSF were the only source of data on femicides in Turkey, the authorities also began to compile their own, although Kav emphasises that the state’s numbers routinely undercount cases.

“Of course our numbers are different,” she says. “The government doesn’t include girls who are under the age of 18 who are victims of femicide, plus they don’t count suspected murders. Our numbers are higher, so the interior ministry says we call everything femicide, but at least they publish reports now,” she adds.

Then there are the cases that become a battle, where Kav and her team have had to become amateur detectives in order to get the state to recognise the murder motive as femicide.

“There are often suspected femicides, meaning that the murder has taken place but the motives are unclear,” she says. “Then there are other types of femicide where the tragedy is concealed as a suicide,” she adds, pointing to the case of Esin Güneş, who was murdered by her husband when the 25-year-old told him she wanted a divorce. “They said she committed suicide by throwing herself on to some rocks, but we proved it was actually a murder,” says Kav.

Proving that a murder was not a suicide is no easy task. “We pressure forensic medicine experts and prosecutors; we find gaps in the incident reports. Often with certain incidents, where the victim has fallen, the court won’t even listen to phone records or collect evidence initially,” says Kav.

TURKEY-POLITICS-RIGHTS-WOMEN-DEMO<br>Demonstrators wearing protective face masks, hold portraits of women and placards reading 'we are not quiet', during a protest called by KCDP (We Will Stop Femicides Platform - Kadin Cinayetlerini Durduracagiz Platformu) and Womens Assemblies, for a better implementation of the Istanbul Convention and the Turkish Law 6284 for protection of the family and prevention of violence against women, in Istanbul, Turkey, on July 19, 2020. (Photo by Yasin AKGUL / AFP) (Photo by YASIN AKGUL/AFP via Getty Images)

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She has her own theories about why femicide is endemic in Turkey. “This is the most important issue for modern women in cities and who are looking for their freedom; they need to be backed up by strong policies and systems of justice,” she says.

“Maybe they want to get divorced and work; to reject domestic violence. These women are fundamentally changing what it means to be a woman in Turkey, and yet it created this crisis. Women are trying to realise themselves and male violence is suppressing it,” she says.

A quiet certainty that Turkish people are feminists, despite the state’s efforts to demonise them, motivates Kav. She points to the public outcry over Erdoğan’s decision to withdraw Turkey from the Istanbul convention. “Only 7% of Turkish people were against the convention, according to polls – the majority of society is in favour,” she says. “Even if they don’t know the content, they support it.”


About the association

Committed women and men from diverse

professions: academics, community

organizers and activists from over 22

countries who educate, advocate and

implement programs to improve women’s

health around the globe.


Address of association

Women and Health Together for the Future (WHTF)


Community Health Science

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Contacts

Dr. Hester Julie

Executive Director, WHTF

hjulie@uwc.ac.za


Dr. Judy Lewis

Chair, WHTF 

lewisj@uchc.edu


Micarla Abrahams

Administrative Staff, WHTF

micarlaabrahams@gmail.com


Kamayani Bali Mahabal

Digital Head, WHTF

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